The US Supreme Court and its decisions

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Pale Rider

...and Hell followed with him.
Citizen
FB friend:

Now that the Supreme Court has established that you only have the right to do things which were mentioned in the Constitution and supported by centuries of tradition, I assume the court will agree that it should be OK to outlaw power windows, cell-phones, GIF files, anything made of carbon-fibre, rap music, yoga pants, and induction stoves.
 

wonko the sane?

You may test that assumption at your convinience.
Citizen
It's also just leveled up voter disenfranchisement. Keep an eye open for MASSIVE investments in private prison companies.
 

Rust

Slightly Off
Citizen
Argument doesn't even hold water since there's plenty of kids being Fostered right now.
Adoption is ridiculously expensive.
 

The Mighty Mollusk

The bold ever fight on, their lives echoed in song
Citizen
Everything is ridiculously expensive, unless you're rich. Which most lawmakers are, so they don't see a problem.
 

wonko the sane?

You may test that assumption at your convinience.
Citizen
Gets even better. If this little nugget existed in a vacuum, it would be horrible enough. But when you combine it with florida's and texas outright attacks on the public education system: it kinda looks like they're striving to create an completely uneducated underclass. And given how many in the adoption system simply age out instead of, you know, getting adopted: an underclass in which even generational knowledge is a luxury they can't afford. Probably an underclass that could be easily lied and bullied into joining the military.

If they're aiming to THAT quickly populate the military in about 20 years: not only do the republicans still have long term plans (which, lets face it; is actually kinda amazing for politicians.) but those plans probably involve turning the US into an absolute police state.
 

Spin-Out

Active member
Citizen
Gets even better. If this little nugget existed in a vacuum, it would be horrible enough. But when you combine it with florida's and texas outright attacks on the public education system: it kinda looks like they're striving to create an completely uneducated underclass. And given how many in the adoption system simply age out instead of, you know, getting adopted: an underclass in which even generational knowledge is a luxury they can't afford. Probably an underclass that could be easily lied and bullied into joining the military.

If they're aiming to THAT quickly populate the military in about 20 years: not only do the republicans still have long term plans (which, lets face it; is actually kinda amazing for politicians.) but those plans probably involve turning the US into an absolute police state.
too bad for them that their regime will have long since collapsed in 20 years. either because the racist white boomers that keep them in power will all be dead, or because the US will be balkanized by then.
 

Coglestop

Grand Emperor of the Empire of One Square Foot.
Citizen
Or both. While the BULK of the people keeping the Republicans in power are boomers, they do have quite the following in later generations amongst various Randites and incels.
 

Ultra Magnus13

Member
Citizen
FB friend:
I mean, yes. Excluding Rap music, which should be protected under free speech, if a state wanted to create a law to ban power windows, they certainly could if it had enough support, just as a state could codify into there constitution that you couldn't ban power windows.
 

Patch

Active member
Citizen
Interesting article that explains why today's anti-abortion activists are all for protecting the unborn, against doing anything to help the born: https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/a...ortion-pro-life-protestants-catholics/629779/

In 1973 many of the most vocal opponents of abortion were northern Democrats who believed in an expanded social-welfare state and who wanted to reduce abortion rates through prenatal insurance and federally funded day care. In 2022, most anti-abortion politicians are conservative Republicans who are skeptical of such measures. What happened was a seismic religious and political shift in opposition to abortion that has not occurred in any other Western country.
It identifies the cause as a shift from opposition to abortion being supported mainly by Catholics to being supported mainly by evangelical Protestants.

As late as the beginning of this century, Texas still had a pro-abortion-rights (Protestant) Republican senator, while Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Minnesota were still represented in Congress by anti-abortion Democrats who were Catholic. But as the historically Catholic population of the North became less devout and therefore less inclined to follow the Church’s teaching on abortion—and as a younger generation of progressive Democrats began to view reproductive rights as a nonnegotiable part of the Democratic Party platform—anti-abortion influence in the politically liberal states of the Northeast diminished, while it expanded in the South.

The anti-abortion movement’s political priorities changed as a result. A movement that in the early ’70s had attracted some political progressives who opposed the Vietnam War and capital punishment became associated in the ’80s and ’90s with evangelical-inspired conservative-Christian nationalism. Early activists wanted to create a comprehensive “culture of life,” but many of the evangelicals who joined the movement in the late 20th century wanted to save America from secularism and take back the nation for God.

Only a minority of white evangelical Protestants were politically progressive; the majority (especially in the South) were conservative, and they combined their commitment to moral regulation with a faith in free-market economics and opposition to social-welfare spending. American evangelicalism had long been the most individualistic of the nation’s Christian traditions, and in keeping with that individualistic theology of sin and salvation, most white evangelicals thought that the government’s interest in morality extended only to the punishment of individual vice, not the reduction of poverty. Thus, as the anti-abortion movement’s political influence shifted away from Catholic states toward evangelical-Protestant regions, it abandoned its earlier calls for federal antipoverty programs, expanded maternal-health insurance, and federally funded day care, and instead focused exclusively on the narrower issue of overturning Roe v. Wade and making abortion illegal.
 

Rust

Slightly Off
Citizen
To be fair, the Judiciary is what's going to keep them in power.

As I've said elsewhere, I've been burnt out on political stuff and looking on with vague defeat. But I'm be brutally honest with folks here:

This is a "Stones in Hand" level situation. Every single one of you needs to have a hard talk with yourselves on what you are willing to do and willing to tolerate to secure the future you want to see. Centralists, time to get that fence post out of your asses and pick a side. Because Justice Thomas is already telling people to "get over it" even though the opinion is in no way final.

So the question to the rest of the American people becomes are you just going to let this pass to? Or are you gonna do something about it? Something potentially that ends in violence? No judgement on my end either way - but this is no longer a hypothetical situation looming on the horizon. The Intruder is in our metaphorical house.

How we going to deal with it?
 
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