Star Trek General Discussion

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Coglestop

Grand Emperor of the Empire of One Square Foot.
Citizen
Keep in mine Dr. White is a bit of a kook. His obsession with FTL propulsion sometimes clouds his methods, and thus his results. Can't argue he isn't passionate about his goals, though. Granted, I hope he IS close to a breakthrough on this front, I just have a rather sizable amount of skepticism on it, especially given who has announced it.
 

Kup

Active member
Citizen
So how soon do the Vulcan’s land since we’re now eligible for first contact? Maybe that will be the thing that finally unites…

Never mind. Too optimistic for a Sunday evening.
 

Telly

Sack of monkeys in my pocket
Citizen
still gotta get those inertial dampers running before we hit warp. well, i guess we dont HAVE to...

i cant imagine the time it took to get this ready

 
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wonko the sane?

You may test that assumption at your convinience.
Citizen
still gotta get those inertial dampers running before we hit warp. well, i guess we dont HAVE to...
As long as you don't mind literal months at constant, low G acceleration till you hit and then overcome the light barrier.

But STILL: Even zipping around at 1/4 or 1/3rd the speed of light will make colonization and exploitation of the solar system economically and physically viable.
 

Coglestop

Grand Emperor of the Empire of One Square Foot.
Citizen
You don't need the inertial dampeners for warp travel. Under warp the ship isn't technically moving, the space around it is. The inertial dampeners are for use under impulse so you don't get flattened during high, but sub light speed maneuvers.(or going from stop to full impulse in a matter of seconds)
 

Kalidor

Administrator
Staff member
Council of Elders
Citizen
Yeah. If they could just get up to enough speed to simulate 1G you'd use the "back" of the ship as the "ground" and there would be gravity. The problem is you'd have to slowly ramp down in speed in the opposite direction as you approach wherever it is you want to go or you'd get splatted if you suddenly stopped.
 

Steevy Maximus

Well-known member
Citizen
Y'all remember when Playmates Star Trek line was THE hottest collector line of the early 90s? When Star Trek was a bigger franchise than Star Wars? Playmates apparently got the license back again and is looking to tickle them nostalgia buttons with their new line of Star Trek Universe Collection. Older figures will feature "nostalgic packaging" while figures from the newer series will get new "Universe packaging". First round of figures due online in July, in stores this fall.

I DO dig them. I was heavy into Star Trek before Star Wars flared up, and keeping the scale is interesting. Sculpting detail is better, but they still "feel" like those Playmates figures from back in the day.
 

Kup

Active member
Citizen
Aww man. Where’s Riker’s ripped uniform with his signature palm-to-the-chin attack hand? Lame

(kidding of course)
 

Dake

Well-known member
Citizen
Yeah. If they could just get up to enough speed to simulate 1G you'd use the "back" of the ship as the "ground" and there would be gravity. The problem is you'd have to slowly ramp down in speed in the opposite direction as you approach wherever it is you want to go or you'd get splatted if you suddenly stopped.

You use a constant 1G acceleration to the half-way point and then "flip over" and do a constant 1G "deceleration". The real problem is reaction mass of some sort, which we haven't really solved.
 

wonko the sane?

You may test that assumption at your convinience.
Citizen
Realistically, the problem is engines, not power. We have sources of power deep enough to make the literal **** tons of power needed to move stuff, just look at any nuclear powered air craft carrier: doesn't need to refuel except once a decade. We just don't have any engines that turn electrical power into directional thrust with sufficient output to carry all the crap the engines need to keep going to space.

Soon as we can make an ion engine that can reach escape velocity, or a device that can negate gravity or mass or something like that: then we're golden for tooling around the property. Visiting the neighbours, not so much, but the immediate area of our solar system: yeah.
 

Ryougabot

Active member
Citizen
I finally figured out the marketing plan of the franchise. They are making shows that speak to ever demographic. Disco is for the woke millennials, Lower Decks is for Family Guy/Rick Morty fans, Picard is for Xers who remember Next Generation, Prodigy is for Xers who remember Voyager...and their kids, and Strange New Worlds it targeted at Boomers/Xers who want a certain feel. CBS is going to see which flavor makes the most money, and that will be the direction of the franchise.
 

Copper Bezel

Revenge against God for the crime of Being.
Citizen
You use a constant 1G acceleration to the half-way point and then "flip over" and do a constant 1G "deceleration". The real problem is reaction mass of some sort, which we haven't really solved.
I've seen it said that this isn't strictly a very efficient way of getting around - if there's anything you can do to shorten the burn time and get the same impulse out of it, you make the middle part of the journey where you aren't thrusting anymore faster, so if a bigger engine lets you part with half of your fuel in half the time, you're winning, while increasing the amount of fuel runs you into the rocket equation and doesn't reduce travel time as fast. But if the limitations are strictly on your acceleration and there's no way around it, and fuel isn't an object, it makes sense. (Which, of course, is why they do it in The Expanse, which has magic impulse engines but not warp, and substitute "crew comfort and health" for "ease of filming".)
 
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